We have teacup maltese puppies for sale.

 

PUPPY COLLECTION INC.

Teacup Puppies in Florida.   Puppies For Sale Site specialize in Teacup Puppies and Toy Breeds.    We are located in the Ft. Lauderdale area in South Florida.  Browse through our beautiful Teacup Yorkies, Teacup Maltese and Pomeranian puppies.   The Teacup Puppies are guaranteed on genetics for one year and 14 days virus.  We do ship our little Teacup and Regular size puppies and also offer a "Nanny" Service, where your teacup will be accompanied by a Nanny and hand deliver the puppy to you.

 

 

 
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Leash Training Your Pomeranian Puppy

It is important to allow your puppy plenty of time to get used to wearing the collar and leash before you ever attempt to lead the Pomeranian Puppy. It is always best to perform this exercise in the home or other environment where the Pomeranian  puppy feels safe and secure. After the puppy is comfortable and content walking on the leash in the home, you will be able to slowly take him outside. It is best to start these outside trips very short at the beginning, and to slowly lengthen them over time.  Please have patience with your new puppy.

Get The Pomeranian Puppy Used To The Leash
A  Pomeranian Puppy isn't born automatically accustomed to a leash and collar. For some, it's a real shock to find something suddenly hanging off his neck, and an even bigger shock when that thing is pulled up short, stopping him in his tracks. Give him a few days to get used the idea first.

Start by attaching a string about two feet in length to his collar. For a small pup, this should be long enough to trail behind him, and for him to play with, but not heavy enough to be really noticeable. Let the Pomeranian puppy play and drag it around until he ignores it completely. At this point, exchange it for a heavier rope, and repeat.

Once the puppy is  ignoring the rope too, put the actual leash on, and let him get used to that too. Once he's ignoring the leash too, start to step on it once in a while, to stop the Pomeranian Puppy from moving forward, and then pull on it to compel him in a different direction than he wants to go. He might fight it, or he might go out of curiosity.

The Teacup Pomeranian Fights The Leash
Some  Pomeranian Puppies just don't appreciate being led around. If he starts to fight the leash, and I mean full body twisting, yanking, biting at the leash, not just resisting the pull. Once he starts fighting, don't let go of the leash, and don't continue to pull on it, yet.
  • Call your Teacup Pomeranian puppy, and make whatever goofy noises you need to bring him to your side.
  • Take up the slack in the leash.
  • As your puppy comes toward you; keep reeling in the leash, but only to bring up the slack, not to pull.
  • Reward him heavily for coming to you.
  • Repeat. And repeat often.

    Teach Him Not To Pull On The Leash
    My favorite method for teaching a puppy not to pull on the leash is the "tree" method. Become an immovable object until your pup ceases to balk at the leash and allows a slack to develop. A standard nylon buckle collar and a six-foot leash is all you will need for this simple training exercise.
  • Stand in place, allow the Pomeranian puppy to sniff around.
  • When the pup decides to go in one direction
  • The human stands immobile allowing the  Pomeranian Puppy to pull, but neither correcting this pulling, nor enforcing it (allowing  Pomeranian Puppy to pull you in that direction).
  • As soon as a 'slack' is evident in the leash, move in the direction your Teacup puppy wants to go (enforcing the slackness of the leash), and praise loudly.
  • Stop dead as soon as your puppy starts to pull on the leash again.
  • Continue this daily, becoming a tree as soon as he starts to pull.

    Remember to keep training sessions both short and positive, so training stays fun for you and your puppy. Puppies have notoriously short attention spans, so five minutes at a time, several times a day will help cement things firmly in your puppy's mind without him growing to resent the time take away from play.  Take your time and be patience and persistence will get you there.
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